Web Usability Common Sense in Don't Make Me Think

Did you know since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design?
Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject.

Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And it’s still short, profusely illustrated…and best of all–fun to read.

If you’ve read it before, you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world. If you’ve never read it, you’ll see why so many people have said it should be required reading for anyone working on Web sites.

Don't Make Me Think will be required in my publication design class. It is actually a delight to read, funny, clear and practical. Many of the usability principles actually apply to print publications as well these days when multitasking people want instantaneous results. It has too much on usability testing for my purposes, but others may find it useful.

Steve Krug is back with 3rd edition of "Don't Make Me Think", a bit different web design book than readers are used to find on the market. His core common sense approach remains the same, but with all the new devices that people are interacting with these days, the competitiveness of a product relies on how easy it is to use. You could pay for a professional like Krug to determine how usable your product is, if you can afford it. But even then, it's important to learn the principles yourself so you know whether the person you hire is considering and addressing the right issues. Happily, this book practices what it preaches, it's written in a friendly chatty way and well designed. In short, this great book goes down easy.

It all starts with the misleading title because after reading it you will certainly spend some time thinking about ideas presented inside, about quality improve quality of web site you already have or creating a new one using numerous tips author provided.
For the most part this book is actually more a presentation and a picture book than the usual design book but it's great because using pictures and examples of what is good and what is not the author is sending best messages.

Therefore, you can be sure that after reading/viewing it you'll have at least several new ideas how to improve usability of your website understanding your user better - what they like and what they don't and how the regular user is browsing through the Internet.

Web usability is feature about many web designers don't think enough or not at all resulting in websites that are maybe nice or full of information but unusable.

This book is essential for everyone who is developing user interfaces of any kind (not only web). It delivers just exactly what you need to improve your work. Pretty easy to read and understand.